Tuesday, November 23, 2004

The parliamentary meeting has just started; 191 deputies have registered; most or even all pro-Yanukovych people aren't there, nor are the Communists. Lytvyn, the speaker, allowed to broadcast the meeting live outside, where the crowd has gathered (at that point someone got up and left, leaving a blue (pro-Yanukovych) flag behind, and someone from the orange side, threw the blue flag over to the floor - I guess the Yanukovych people didn't want anyone outside to know what's being said). Lytvyn has also talked about the joint responsibility of the President, Cabinet of Ministers and the Parliament for the situation and its outcome, and said that it is amoral and criminal to pretend that nothing's going on (I'm sure he meant Kuchma and Yanukovych - they pretend to have a usual working day today)...

They'll spend a few hours talking - my father is taping it. So far, I'm hearing very good stuff from the Nasha Ukraina (Our Ukraine) bloc led by Yushchenko - we've won, but there were many violations, etc. Wonderful.


  1. One of the biggest countries of Europe is on a crossroad of its history. But the media coverage in Western Europe is very reserved. It will change today, I hope.

  2. Hey I'm an American living in Romania... we're following your coverage girl and rooting for Yuschenko to win! Keep up the good work and keep blogging!

  3. Keep up the good work - the news sources from the States and Western Europe are being utterly useless at covering this (English-language ones, at a ny rate) - I'm having to rely almost entirely on blogs and other online services to keep tabs.

    Perhaps some of these links may be of interest - I've been collecting them for the last 18 hours, and am planning to keep going.

  4. Hi Neeka,
    I'm an American who was Ukraine for the past 3 weeks, so I'm following the news with great interest. Keep up the blogging! The news reports we are getting over here are rather sketchy, so it's great to hear from the blog world.
    We're pulling for you and and praying that justice will be done! Cheers!

  5. I am following the events in your country through your blog. Thanks for being here, from a Dutch blogger in France.

  6. For those of you who are interested, here was a rundown of what the American media had to say on Monday. I guess we should not be surprised.

  7. I've really appreciate what you HAVE posted--even with your connection being frustrating. I'm out in Pozhnaki with my kids, and won't be in the center at all. You've given great verbal pics of what's happening and so I feel more connected.

    Everyone is talking about the election, everywhere I go. The women at the grocery this morning were animatedly discussing the roads being blocked and buses to Kyiv being stopped and searched. Orange is everywhere, even outside the center.


  8. It's true that the televisions networks in the US can be disgracefully narrow in their news coverage, but the Ukraine election is front and center on the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. I'm writing from Boston, following the results as best I can - good luck to you and Ukraine Neeka!

  9. This is my first visit to your blog (via Instapundit).

    I am trying to figure out where do you live so close to Bessarabka . I studied in the 145th fiz-math school once :-)... and lived on the Gorki/Fizkulturna intersection, and also on Jaroslavov Val between 64 and 1980.

    Good luck and best wishes to you, my family and friends in Kiev and ...everyone